Thursday, December 10, 2009

QUEENSLAND PROCLAMATION DAY - 150 YEARS 10 DECEMBER 2009




Proclamation Day – 10 December 1859


Birth of Queensland

On Saturday 10 December 1859 the proclamation declaring Queensland a separate colony from New South Wales was read from the balcony of Adelaide House now the Deanery of St John’s Cathedral in Ann Street.

Fireworks, cannon fire, flag raisings and the sound of a gun shot added to the excitement.

Elaborate plans had been made for the reception and Governor Sir George Ferguson Bowen sailed into Brisbane with his wife, Lady Diamantina to take up his position as Queensland’s first Governor.

On arrival at the Botanic Gardens, they were greeted by over 4000 people waiting on the river banks from where the Governor’s party proceeded to the State’s first temporary Government House (Adelaide House) in Adelaide Street (now the Deanery of St John’s Cathedral).

Dignatories with the Governor’s party included the Colonial Secretary elect Robert Herbert who became Queensland’s first Premier

The proclamation and Letters Patent were published in the Queensland Government Gazette on that same day legalising the proclamation.

On 12 December 1859, Governor Bowen received and replied to addresses from community groups from Brisbane and Ipswich followed by a regatta and evening fireworks.

Queen Victoria had signed the Letters Patent creating the new colony on 6 June 1859 (Queensland Day).

How it all began

The push for separation from New South Wales began in earnest in the early 1850s. Between 1851 and 1854, a number of public meetings were held and by January 1856 a series of petitions had been sent to Queen Victoria seeking the establishment of a new colony.

On 10 July 1859, the ship ‘Clarence’ with the word ‘Separation’ painted on its hull sailed into Brisbane bringing the news that on 6 June 1859, Queen Victoria had signed the Letters Patent.

The news was greeted by a jubilant crowd and the vessel was welcomed with a 14-gun salute and fireworks.

The Queen favoured the name Queensland over suggestions to call it Cooksland in honour of Captain James Cook.

1909

In 1909 Queensland celebrated its 50th year with a Jubilee Exhibition at the annual Brisbane Agricultural Show (the EKKA) and the official opening of the University of Queensland in the Botanic Gardens.

1959

In 1959 Queensland celebrated its centenary with a huge array of events including Princess Alexandra’s tour of Queensland and the publication of an official centenary commemorative book, Queensland Daughter of the Sun (edited by Clem Lack)

The program of celebration for the year included a Centenary Regatta at Southport, Australian Life Saving Championships at Mooloolaba, a Centenary Festival of Immigration, the Royal National Association Centenary Show and a Cavalcade of Transport.


GOVENOR BOWEN AND HIS WIFE LADY DIAMANTINA BOWEN AND PARTY

RE-ENACTMENT OF THE FLOTILLA COMING UP THE RIVER TO GOVERNMENT HOUSE, BOTANICAL GARDENS

1 comment:

  1. what a fun celebration! So sunny and bautiful on the river! wish I were there! Greetings from Utah!

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